Witness: Trip to Hamilton to buy marijuana ends in fatal shooting at residence

Cameron Wilson of Harrison is charged with murder and felonious assault for allegedly fatally shooting Darrian K. Shamel in Hamilton in 2020. Wilson's trial continued Tuesday in Butler County Common Pleas Court. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF
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Cameron Wilson of Harrison is charged with murder and felonious assault for allegedly fatally shooting Darrian K. Shamel in Hamilton in 2020. Wilson's trial continued Tuesday in Butler County Common Pleas Court. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF

Cameron Wilson was one of three Cincinnati men who drove to Hamilton in the summer of 2020 to buy marijuana, but when the man they were visiting opened the door, Wilson shot him, a witness testified Tuesday during Wilson’s trial.

Wilson, 21, of Harrison, is facing charges of murder and felonious assault for allegedly shooting and killing Darrian K. Shamel shortly after midnight on June 2, 2020. His trial began Monday in Butler County Common Pleas Court.

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Officers were called to the 700 block of Charlton Avenue about 12:15 a.m. on June 2, 2020 and found Shamel had been shot. Shamel, 22, was transported to Fort Hamilton Hospital, where he died.

The defense says the prosecution has the wrong suspect and Wilson is not the shooter.

Defense attorney Mary Martin filed a notice of alibi on Wilson’s behalf stating he was in Hamilton County at the time police say Wilson was shot and killed.

In the motion, Wilson said that at the time of Shamel’s slaying, he was at his home in Harrison with his brother, then a friend’s residence in Cincinnati, then back at his home with his brother after a stop on Robben Lane in Cincinnati.

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But 20-year-old Blake Michels testified Wilson picked him and another person up near his residence on June 1, 2020. They when to purchase marijuana from a person in Hamilton County and then eventually drove to Shamel’s residence to “buy weed.” Michels said Wilson also wanted some acid and ecstasy.

Michels said he had been to Shamel’s apartment off Gordon Smith Boulevard several times to purchase marijuana.

Wilson parked his white Kia in the lot, then he and Michael went to the apartment building, according to Michels. Shamel came to the door and they were shaking hands, Michels said. Wilson was in the doorway behind him.

“And Cameron (Wilson) shot him … twice,” Michels said. He testified he didn’t know prior to the shooting that Wilson had a gun.

Wilson pulled him out of the doorway and told him to run, he testified.

“I was told to run, so I ran,” Michels said.

The trio drove back to Cincinnati. Michels said he didn’t ask Wilson about the shooting or a motive.

“I guess I was scared of him,” Michels said. After stopping his house briefly, Michaels said Wilson took him home to his residence and dropped him off.

He didn’t call police to report the shooting, because “I was scared for my family.”

During cross examination, Martin pointed out that Michels was less than truthful during his first two interviews with police detectives. He admitted he lied.

When questioned by Martin what was discussed in the car after a “horrific” shooting, Michels said, “I personally went to sleep, so I don’t know. I shut down.”

Martin also noted Michels called Wilson multiple times the day after the shooting, despite professing to be so scared.

“Keep you friends close and your enemies closer,” Michels said.

The defense pointed a lack of physical evidence placing Wilson at the shooting scene and communication between Michaels and two other people who could be suspects in the shooting. Also in a 911 call placed by Shamel’s mother, witnesses said he had been shot by a white male.

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