Hamilton’s Cunningham sisters appear on ‘The Voice’ and more: 5 uplifting Butler County stories this week

Here’s a look at five positive Butler County stories that were in the news this week:


‘Oh, my God! What?’: Hamilton’s Cunningham sisters courted by superstar coaches during appearance on ‘The Voice’

Credit: Nick Graham

Credit: Nick Graham

Hamilton’s The Cunningham Sisters made their well-received appearance on “The Voice” on Tuesday, joining Kelly Clarkson’s team.

Macie and Marie Cunningham, a duo that has performed for years in and around Hamilton were sought by both Clarkson and Springfield native John Legend. In an upset that surprised even Clarkson, the Hamilton girls chose her.

Before the sisters’ performance, they tearfully shared their story about how they sometimes felt excluded from groups, both Black and white, because they are biracial, daughters of a red-headed mother and an albino father.

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Fairfield man walks 21.5 miles to Great American Ball Park, raises $12K for Joe Nuxhall Miracle League

A Fairfield man raised nearly $12,000 in pledges for the Joe Nuxhall Miracle League after he walked from his home to Great American Ball Park Friday.

Ben Otto left his home at 7 a.m. Friday and made the 21.5-mile walk to the stadium.

When he arrived at the stadium, he posed with his wife, Laura, in front of the Nuxhall stadium outside the park.

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Hamilton wood shop to be home to expanding laser works business run by police lieutenant and wife

Brian and Kelly Robinson stay busy creating unique items customized with lasers in the basement of their historic Rossville home. But they will soon move “the laser lair” to a renovated Main Street store front.

Kelly, a retired cargo plane pilot, and Brian, a Hamilton Police Department lieutenant, tapped into their creative side to form High Main Laserworks months ago. Now the plan is to move to the former Little Wood Shop on Main building.

The structure, built in 1924, is a recognizable building near the intersection of Main and Eaton/Millville avenues that was home to a master wood worker, Seldon D. Brown, until his unexpected death in December. The Robinsons bought the building in August.

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Middie Way Baseball ‘off to an incredible start’ after hundreds of kids attend five free camps

A Middletown pastor met several Hamilton West Side Little League All-Star players, parents and coaches Saturday night at Great American Ball Park when the team was honored for finishing second in the Little League World Series.

Pastor Lamar Ferrell from Berachah Church dreams that one day a team from Middletown will play in the Little League World Series, but that’s years away since the city has no youth baseball program.

Middletown took a major step this summer to resurrecting baseball when five free Middie Way Baseball Camps were held at Lefferson Park. The last camp was Saturday and it attracted more than 100 kids who received instruction from local players, coaches and volunteers.

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Badin students build access for homebound military veteran

Some area high school seniors volunteered Monday to help an elderly, disabled military veteran by building a wheelchair ramp to free him from being homebound.

The Badin High School teens had earlier started a GoFundMe page and raised more than $2,500 to pay for the ramp they assembled — with help from adult supervisors from the local “Operation Ramp It Up” charitable organization.

More than a half dozen Badin students worked for hours at U.S. Army veteran Robert Netherland’s Fairfield home installing the aluminum walkway that will allow him easier access to and from his house.

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AND, for an extra sixth story of the day ...

Fairfield elementary school hopes to find bone marrow donor for beloved principal

It’s normal for Fairfield West Elementary School Principal Missy Muller to get stopped for a hug in the halls of her school, but it’s happening a little more often this week.

Muller has myelodysplastic syndrome, or MDS, a rare condition in which the body doesn’t produce enough healthy blood cells. MDS can become leukemia if left untreated, and Muller needs to find a bone marrow match to improve her odds.

“Last week was a little tough, because the kids found out,” she said Wednesday. “So then, they’re all hugging me.”

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