Afternoon catchup: 5 Butler County stories you need to know today

Cameron Kyles FILE

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Cameron Kyles FILE

Here’s a look at five big Butler County stories today to catch up on the news:


Trial begins today for man charged in 2019 Middletown shooting

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Cameron Kyles FILE

Cameron Kyles FILE

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Cameron Kyles FILE

The trial is scheduled to begin today for a man accused in the 2019 fatal shooting of a man in his Middletown home.

Cameron Kyles, now 20, is charged with aggravated murder, aggravated robbery, aggravated burglary, felonious assault and having weapons under disability for the Oct. 12, 2019 death of Michael Stewart II.

Kyles has had four court-appointed attorneys, changes to which resulted in trial continuations, and two psychological evaluations before being declared competent to stand trial. He has also rejected a plea offer by the prosecution.

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Hamilton’s Cunningham Sisters make it on The Voice

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The Cunningham sisters, Marie, 13, left, and Macie, 15, have been singing on social media trying to spread a positive message and recently sent an audition video to the television show The Voice. NICK GRAHAM / STAFF

Credit: Nick Graham

The Cunningham sisters, Marie, 13, left, and Macie, 15, have been singing on social media trying to spread a positive message and recently sent an audition video to the television show The Voice. NICK GRAHAM / STAFF

Credit: Nick Graham

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The Cunningham sisters, Marie, 13, left, and Macie, 15, have been singing on social media trying to spread a positive message and recently sent an audition video to the television show The Voice. NICK GRAHAM / STAFF

Credit: Nick Graham

Credit: Nick Graham

What do you say when you can finally tell the world you’ll appear on NBC’s The Voice, which gives singers a shot at a music career?

For the Cunningham Sisters, the first thing was, “OMG,” for Oh, my God.

“OMG,” they wrote on their Facebook page. “It has been so hard to keep this secret!!!! We are so thrilled and excited to finally be able to announce that we auditioned for The Voice! See what happens during the season premiere September 20th on NBC #TheVoice.”

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2020 Census could mean $40 million to Butler County: How it works

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Liberty Twp. grew by 6,740 residents according to the 2020 census, the largest population bump in Butler County. Construction continues on single family and multi-family units at The Villas at Fieldstone Farms, a Ryan Homes community, off of Millikin Road in Liberty Township.

Credit: NICK GRAHAM / STAFF

Liberty Twp. grew by 6,740 residents according to the 2020 census, the largest population bump in Butler County.
Construction continues on single family and multi-family units at The Villas at Fieldstone Farms, a Ryan Homes community, off of Millikin Road in Liberty Township.

Credit: NICK GRAHAM / STAFF

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Liberty Twp. grew by 6,740 residents according to the 2020 census, the largest population bump in Butler County. Construction continues on single family and multi-family units at The Villas at Fieldstone Farms, a Ryan Homes community, off of Millikin Road in Liberty Township.

Credit: NICK GRAHAM / STAFF

Credit: NICK GRAHAM / STAFF

The data from the 2020 U.S. Census were recently released, and with 22,227 new residents, Butler County could mean an additional $40 million in new state and federal funding to help social service programs, roads and local governments.

The rule of thumb is that every person counted equates to about $1,800 in state and federal funding for things like Medicaid, food stamps, roads and other programs supported by outside sources.

Butler County Development Director David Fehr said residents will reap the benefits because new funding levels for the next 10 years will be based on a population of 390,357. He said a $40 million funding bump “spread across all the different federal federal programs doesn’t sound unreasonable.”

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$97 million in Butler County requests: What locals want to do with COVID-19 relief funds

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Leaves on trees around Butler County are turning colors in Fall of 2020. This is Rentschler Forest MetroPark situated along the bank of the Great Miami River. NICK GRAHAM / STAFF

Credit: Nick Graham

Leaves on trees around Butler County are turning colors in Fall of 2020. This is Rentschler Forest MetroPark situated along the bank of the Great Miami River. NICK GRAHAM / STAFF

Credit: Nick Graham

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Leaves on trees around Butler County are turning colors in Fall of 2020. This is Rentschler Forest MetroPark situated along the bank of the Great Miami River. NICK GRAHAM / STAFF

Credit: Nick Graham

Credit: Nick Graham

The Butler County commissioners heard the first pitches for part of the $75 million federal American Rescue Plan Act funding last week, and the overarching theme was improving the physical and economic health of the county.

The county has received dozens of requests totaling about $97 million for spending the windfall cash that is coming as part of President Joe Biden’s rescue plan. Requests run the gamut from new educational and economic development opportunities to addressing social service needs of the county.

The commissioners have $74.5 million in funds to share. These are some of the proposals entities have submitted so far.

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Plea hearing continued for man accused of abusing Middletown boy, abusing body

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This March 8, 2021 photo shows James Hamilton during a Bond hearing in Butler County Common Pleas Court in Hamilton, Ohio. Hamilton is charged with multiple counts in connection to the disposal of the body of his girlfriend's 6-year-old son James Hutchinson. (Nick Graham/Dayton Daily News via AP)

Credit: Nick Graham

This March 8, 2021 photo shows James Hamilton during a Bond hearing in Butler County Common Pleas Court in Hamilton, Ohio. Hamilton is charged with multiple counts in connection to the disposal of the body of his girlfriend's 6-year-old son James Hutchinson. (Nick Graham/Dayton Daily News via AP)

Credit: Nick Graham

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This March 8, 2021 photo shows James Hamilton during a Bond hearing in Butler County Common Pleas Court in Hamilton, Ohio. Hamilton is charged with multiple counts in connection to the disposal of the body of his girlfriend's 6-year-old son James Hutchinson. (Nick Graham/Dayton Daily News via AP)

Credit: Nick Graham

Credit: Nick Graham

A Middletown man accused of abusing a 6-year-old boy and disposing of his body in the Ohio River after his mother killed him was in Butler County Common Pleas Court today for an expected plea hearing, but it was continued.

James Hamilton stood before Judge Noah Powers II and began the hearing in which he was scheduled to plead guilty to kidnapping, two counts of child endangering and gross abuse of a corpse.

After conferencing with Hamilton’s attorney Jeremy Evans and prosecutors, Powers paused the hearing for a few minutes. The hearing began again and again there was a bench conference. After the second adjournment, Powers said the hearing would be continued until Tuesday afternoon.

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AND, for an extra sixth story of the day ...

Fairfield pauses city manager search after more than 8 months

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Fairfield plans to use a recently completed market study on the northern Ohio 4 corridor (Nilles Road to the city limits) to improve its marketability in both the residential and business sectors. Pictured is the corridor just south of the city limits with Hamilton. MICHAEL D. PITMAN/STAFF

Fairfield plans to use a recently completed market study on the northern Ohio 4 corridor (Nilles Road to the city limits) to improve its marketability in both the residential and business sectors. Pictured is the corridor just south of the city limits with Hamilton. MICHAEL D. PITMAN/STAFF

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Fairfield plans to use a recently completed market study on the northern Ohio 4 corridor (Nilles Road to the city limits) to improve its marketability in both the residential and business sectors. Pictured is the corridor just south of the city limits with Hamilton. MICHAEL D. PITMAN/STAFF

Fairfield will continue without a permanent new city manager in the coming months.

City council announced this week that it would stop its search after applicants were discussed in an executive session meeting Wednesday.

“At this time, council has determined that the best interests of the city will be served by pausing our search to allow the unopposed candidates for city council to have input into the decision-making process,” according to a statement from Councilman Dale Paullus, who has been leading the search process.

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