Wilmington man charged with online threats after participation in US Capitol riot

A screenshot of one of Justin Stoll's videos posted to social media was included in a criminal complaint accusing the 40-year-old Wilmington man of making threats connected to his participation of riots at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

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A screenshot of one of Justin Stoll's videos posted to social media was included in a criminal complaint accusing the 40-year-old Wilmington man of making threats connected to his participation of riots at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

A Wilmington man was federally charged with making interstate threats and threatening a witness during online communications related to his participation in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol.

Justin Stoll, 40, was arrested Friday morning by the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force and appeared in U.S. District Court in Cincinnati, according to a release from David M. DeVillers, U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio.

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Stoll, who used the username “Th3RealHuckleberry” on the app Clapper and on YouTube, posted videos of his participation in the Capitol riots, according to an affidavit.

A mob of President Donald Trump’s supporters stormed the Capitol, which caused members of Congress to take cover and resulted in five deaths.

In one video, Stoll reportedly asks viewers whether he should wear a black U.S. flag shirt to Washington, D.C., stating, “Basically, if you are an enemy combatant, you will be shot on sight … I know this is the end-all flag …”

Stoll also allegedly posted videos of himself outside the Capitol with others during the riot, saying, among other things, “D.C.’s a war zone! … You ain’t got enough cops, baby! We are at war at the Capitol … We have taken the Capitol. This is our country.”

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Stoll received comments from concerned people in response to his YouTube videos, including one who claimed to have saved Stoll’s video, according to the court document. In another video, Stoll responded in part:

“Well, that shows your f****** ignorance because, clearly, the Capitol building is owned by the people, so again, nothing will happen. Secondly, I never admitted I went into it, did I? Go watch the video again. Daddy’s not stupid. (Wink) Third, if you ever in your f***** existence did something to jeopardize taking me away from my family, you will absolutely meet your maker. You can play that for the D.A. in court. I don’t care. If you ever jeopardize me from being with my family, you will absolutely meet your mother f****** maker, and I will be the one to arrange the meeting.”

Interstate communication of a threat is a federal crime punishable by up to five years in prison. Tampering with a witness through intimidation carries a potential maximum sentence of 20 years in prison, according to the Justice Department.

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