‘Vision for the city’ presented to Middletown City Council

Middletown City Council heard the first reading of the proposed Comprehensive Plan Tuesday night and will vote on the plan on April 19. FILE PHOTO

caption arrowCaption
Middletown City Council heard the first reading of the proposed Comprehensive Plan Tuesday night and will vote on the plan on April 19. FILE PHOTO

Vote on Comprehensive Plan scheduled for April 19 meeting; more data sought

Middletown City Council heard the first reading of the Comprehensive Plan, what a consultant called the “vision for the city,” during Tuesday’s two-hour meeting.

After Greg Dale, from Cincinnati-based consultants McBride Dale Clarion, made his presentation, Jennifer Chen, a Middletown resident with a master’s degree in planning, questioned why the Comprehensive Plan lacked significant data and demographics to assist in decision making.

In 2005, the last time the city completed a Comprehensive Plan, she said it included six pages of data.

Council seemed to agree with Chen and asked Paul Lolli, acting city manager, to compile the most recent census data available. Mayor Nicole Condrey said council should know the infrastructure needs of the city before making any development plans.

The Planning Commission voted at its December meeting to table the Comprehensive Plan for two months pending additional public outreach. The commission reviewed the plan at its regular meeting on Feb. 9, then forwarded it to City Council for approval.

Council will hear the second reading and vote on the plan at its next meeting on April 19.

City staff started working on the plan in 2018, then it was revised when then-City Manager Doug Adkins was fired and City Manager Jim Palenick was hired, said Ashley Combs, director of development services.

Now the plan is being considered by Lolli, the city’s third city manager since the plan was initiated.

Once the plan has been approved, Combs said it’s important that the city take the information and “push it forward so it doesn’t sit on the shelf.”

Dale said city leaders should review the list of “actions items” and consider it “a to-do list.”

He said the city should prioritize some items and try to accomplish them this year.

The plan, called “Destination Middletown,” is divided into five themes: Resilient Neighborhoods, Thriving Economy, Strong Infrastructure, Healthy and Safe Living and Pride in Community.

It should exemplifies the community’s “vision and goals” for the city in the future, according to a city document.

The plan is meant to aid Middletown with improving its standing as a “premier community” through improving quality of life and opportunities for residents and visitors, the city said.

A Steering Committee, city staff, Planning Commission, City Council, citizens and stakeholders had input on the plan, the city said.

About the Author