Treatment ordered for Dayton man charged in Warren County carjackings

Judge Tim Tepe on Friday ruled Bryon Finklea Jr., 24, of Dayton, was incompetent to stand trial, but likely to respond to treatment and be ready to stand trial on charges of robbery with a firearms specification, aggravated robbery, endangering children and two counts each of kidnapping and failure to comply with an officer’s order.
 MONTGOMERY COUNTY JAIL
Judge Tim Tepe on Friday ruled Bryon Finklea Jr., 24, of Dayton, was incompetent to stand trial, but likely to respond to treatment and be ready to stand trial on charges of robbery with a firearms specification, aggravated robbery, endangering children and two counts each of kidnapping and failure to comply with an officer’s order. MONTGOMERY COUNTY JAIL

The Dayton man arrested in connection with two carjackings during a two-county police chase in August has been sent for mental health treatment.

Judge Tim Tepe on Friday ruled Bryon Finklea Jr., 24, of Dayton, is incompetent to stand trial but likely to respond to treatment and be ready to stand trial. He faces charges of robbery with a firearms specification, aggravated robbery, endangering children and two counts each of kidnapping and failure to comply with an officer’s order.

Finklea was arrested three days after allegedly leading state troopers on a chase Aug. 8 from the Franklin area to West Chester Twp.

ExploreDayton man held in car-jackings, police chase claims incompetency

An Ohio State Highway Patrol pilot first spotted Finklea, clocked at speeds reportedly as much as 100 mph.

Starting on Interstate 75 in Warren County, Finklea is accused of abandoning his disabled vehicle, overpowering the driver of another car and driving off with two children in the backseat. The children were unharmed and let out of the vehicle separately in Lebanon and Mason, according to troopers.

Troopers alleged Finklea then crashed that car and ran to another car, which he took from a young driver and escaped when the police pursuit was abandoned due to the high speeds and heavy traffic.

Finklea will be treated at the Summit Behavioral Center.