Hamilton buys property to allow 50-plus apartments, save historic double residence

Hamilton plans to buy the property in the background in the 300 block of Main Street so a developer can build a 50-plus apartment complex without tearing down the historic double residence to the east (not shown) that residents asked Hamilton City Council to spare. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF
Hamilton plans to buy the property in the background in the 300 block of Main Street so a developer can build a 50-plus apartment complex without tearing down the historic double residence to the east (not shown) that residents asked Hamilton City Council to spare. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF

Hamilton is looking to buy the property at 326 Main St. for $100,000 to provide developer Jim Cohen room to build a proposed 50-plus apartment complex while also preventing from demolition a double-residence that people urged City Council to save.

Cohen, whose Blue Ash-based CMC Properties created The Marcum development downtown, had proposed to tear down the duplex at 310-312 Main Street to make way for the apartments.

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But a groundswell of support from area residents on behalf of that Tudor Revival building with Craftsman touches prompted the city to take another approach.

Under the current development plan, Cohen would have demolished the duplex at his cost. The city instead now plans to amend a development agreement to save the residence.

The city plans to issue a request for proposals from people interested in buying the duplex for $100,000.

Instead of using that area, the city plans to buy the property at 326 Main St. from the David S. Dennison and Carol H. Dennison Revocable Trust and demolish that building for the space he needs to build the apartments.

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The city consulted with historic experts who believe the building at 326 Main St. has much less historic value than the duplex does, partly because it has been modified through the years, City Manager Joshua Smith said.

It has a brick office area on the front of it and less historic value, he added.

Because a variety of people expressed interest in the double residence, the city plans to ask would-be buyers of it how they would use it. City officials plan to use the $100,000 from the sale of that building to purchase 326 Main St.

Hamilton residents hope to save attractive house in Main Street business district but developers want to tear it down to make way for apartments. NICK GRAHAM / STAFF
Hamilton residents hope to save attractive house in Main Street business district but developers want to tear it down to make way for apartments. NICK GRAHAM / STAFF

Credit: Nick Graham

Credit: Nick Graham

With construction of the gigantic Spooky Nook Sports Champion Mill underway, various developers have been announcing plans for restaurants, shops and bars along Main Street and in other parts of the city. Some weekends, the complex, which also will have a convention center, will attract more than 10,000 athletes and their families to tournaments from several-hour drives.

The sports complex is scheduled to open in December of 2021.

Among recent announced businesses have been Reptile Pit, Soulshine Wellness on Main, an orthodontist practice that is building several stores near the Steak 'n Shake on Main, and HUB on Main.

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