Students say they’d dispose of a dead body if it cancels their student debt

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

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Vanderbilt professor William Doyle says Ohio ranks 45th of 50 states

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Last week we wrote a serious story about the problems with college affordability in Ohio. See that link here:

Explore Ohio ranks 45th of 50 states in college affordability

Today, we’re taking a little more off-the-wall approach, thanks to a survey from StudentLoans.net. That company asked 501 student loan borrowers what they would be willing to do to eliminate their student debt.

The headline finding? About 23 percent of respondents agreed they would “help their best friend dispose of a dead body, if it meant that they would have no more student loan debt.”

We’ve come a long way from the commercial jingle asking people, “What would you do for a Klondike bar?” But then, average student debt is $29,000 per student, with many Ohioans struggling to pay back their loans into their 40s.

Explore RELATED: Ohio task force addresses college costs, debts

Here are some of the other things borrowers agreed they would do if it meant no more student loan debt, according to the February StudentLoans.net survey.

  • 45.51 percent would eat only burnt toast for the next three years.
  • 18.56 percent would swim in shark infested waters for one hour.
  • 61.28 percent would sacrifice their favorite sports team ever winning a championship again.
  • 70.46 percent would give up Netflix forever.
  • 20.96 percent would give up all future Social Security benefits.
  • 18.76 percent would let the panda bear go extinct in 2017.
  • 45.51 percent would work on the construction of President Trump's proposed border wall for one year.
  • 44.51 percent would give up WiFi for the next five years.
  • 30.34 percent would rather have their student loan debt forgiven than be given free health care for life.
  • 24.15 percent would let the government have access to all of their devices and social media outlets.

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