After Madison football coach’s contract not renewed, deputies called to board meeting

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There are 11 municipal police departments in Butler County.

A boisterous end to a recent school board meeting saw Butler County Sheriff’s deputies called out to Madison Schools’ campus after the contract for the varsity football coach was not renewed.

The Feb. 11 meeting of the Madison Board of Education saw the board vote 4-0, with one member absent, to not renew the coaching contract of Coach Jessie Hubbard.

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According to Hubbard, the meeting, which he said included about two dozen team members and parent supporters of his, saw those backing him leaving the school auditorium upset after the vote.

Former Madison High School Head Football Coach Jesse Hubbard's coaching contract was not renewed during a recent school board meeting and the Butler County Sheriff deputies were called out to the meeting for supporters who allegedly threatening board members. Hubbard, shown here in 2019 coaching New Miami High School's team, says there was no reason given to him for the contract's non-renewal and he said calling out deputies was an unwarranted over-reaction to the situation. (File Photo\Journal-News)
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Former Madison High School Head Football Coach Jesse Hubbard's coaching contract was not renewed during a recent school board meeting and the Butler County Sheriff deputies were called out to the meeting for supporters who allegedly threatening board members. Hubbard, shown here in 2019 coaching New Miami High School's team, says there was no reason given to him for the contract's non-renewal and he said calling out deputies was an unwarranted over-reaction to the situation. (File Photo\Journal-News)

Some became loud about their discouragement as they gathered in a hallway outside the auditorium, he said.

A review by the Journal-News of sheriff records that evening showed calls for deputies were noted by the dispatcher as a “dispute in progress.”

No arrests were made and no deputy incident report was generated from the incident.

Madison board members did not respond to an emailed request to comment, nor did Madison Schools’ Superintendent Lisa Tuttle-Huff.

Hubbard, who was the third football coach in three years at Madison High School, said neither the board nor Tuttle-Huff gave any reason for the non-renewal of his part-time, $6,500 coaching contract.

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According to documents, obtained by the Journal-News through a public records request, Hubbard was suspended for one week in October.

At the time Madison officials stated the district “does not condone the use of lewd or vulgar language when interacting with our student athletes nor public disclosure of private education records.”

“Coaches are expected to maintain a professional relationship with all students at all times and serve as positive role models,” wrote Christine Cooper, director of human resources, in a Oct. 9 letter to Hubbard.

A review of other employment documents showed no other criticism or job actions against him.

But Hubbard blames the non-renewal of his coaching contract on “failed leadership,” claiming district officials gave him no reason.

“I’m not blaming the school board. It was the way I was treated since day one there,” said Hubbard, who prior to taking the Madison head football coach job had led New Miami High School to a 10-0 record in 2019.

Madison was 4-5 last season.

“This has been the worst experience I’ve had in my 11 years of coaching,” said Hubbard, who works full-time as a Butler County Jail Corrections deputy.

He said the phone calls for deputies after the board meeting was “over the top.”

“Some the kids did get loud and I tried to defuse the situation but of course the kids were upset. These poor kids will now have had four (football) coaches in four years,” he said.

Staff Writer Lauren Pack contributed to this story.

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