Bad news for allergy sufferers with warm-up coming

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

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Over the last 10 days, pollen has already been showing up in sensors across the Miami Valley, particularly after 2 or 3 days of temperatures above 50 degrees. With a prolonged period of warmth on the way, experts warn allergy season could be in full gear before March.

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Temperatures for the first half of February are running five degrees above normal.

Storm Center 7 Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell said there have only been five days this month with temperatures near or below normal.

“The unusual warmth has caused some spring bulbs to bloom and trees to bud as the plants wake up from what has been a short winter slumber,” Elwell said.

But while we likely won’t find too many people to complain about the upcoming warm stretch of weather, there will be some that say this weather is something to sneeze at.

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The Regional Air Pollution Control Agency (RAPCA) in Dayton told our Storm Center 7 meteorologists they have started to detect tree pollen as early as late January this year with pollen levels increasing over the last several days.

Brian Huxtable of the agency says it’s still a bit too early to tell with confidence that allergy season has begun, but if the forecast for the next five to seven days verifies, it is very likely pollen levels will continue to rise.

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The crocus flower in Beavercreek as captured by Robert Wies.
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The crocus flower in Beavercreek as captured by Robert Wies.

Elwell says while the coming warmth is impressive, we will likely stay just below record levels.

“What is more impressive, somewhat shocking actually, is the prolonged period of warmth the models are showing,” Elwell said. “High temperatures could stay above 50 degrees for the next 10 days with above average temperatures appearing to be likely through the rest of the month.”

Such a prolonged period of warmth would likely kick off an early growing season to some plants and trees. Elwell says what could be more concerning is if the plants emerge too early, there could be some significant damage if winter decides it wants to make a return in March.

“Despite the spring-like weather that is coming, I wouldn’t let my guard down on winter just yet” Elwell said. “March has been a month to bring some big surprises to the Miami Valley even after a mild winter.”