Wright State could start laying off employees around May 19

WSU interim president Curtis McCray said the university could start laying off employees shortly after May 19.

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WSU interim president Curtis McCray said the university could start laying off employees shortly after May 19.

Wright State University could begin laying off employees in just over 10 days, the school’s interim president said today.

The administration will begin giving notice to employees if the finance committee of the board of trustees recommends the full board approve proposed layoffs and budget cuts, interim president Curtis McCray said. The finance committee meets May 19.

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“If we get that we’re going to start giving notice,” McCray said. “Just for a matter of letting people know because we know there’s a lot of anxiety about it.”

McCray declined to provide more specifics about who will be laid off at WSU.

McCray alluded to the looming layoffs in an email to the campus community on Friday. In the email, McCray said that people and institutions often believe they are immune to certain pitfalls but that “eventually, in the end, the arrow will hit us all.”

“In the days ahead, the economic necessity of Wright State University will result in the removal of some of your colleagues from your midst,” McCray wrote. “They will be gone not through any action of their own (indeed, in many cases their performance may have been exemplary), but because the resources of the university have not been well managed.”

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The university is looking to lay off between 80 and 120 employees to save between $6 million and $8 million. WSU may also leave another 30 to 50 positions open to save an additional $3 million to $5 million, according to proposed cuts presented to the finance committee.

Wright State has to trim $25 million from its upcoming budget while also boosting the school’s reserve fund by $5 million.

The financial crisis the school is facing is the result of years of overspending, school officials have said. The university is projected to have overspent by more than $120 million over the past six years.

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