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Ohio firearms group says gun owners are ‘doing something’

Last week’s mass shooting at a Florida school that left 17 dead and even more injured has rekindled the debate on gun-control issues.

In Ohio, the Buckeye Firearms Association on Friday issued a release noting that a call “to do something” regarding the gun violence such as the Feb. 14 killings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. is ignoring ongoing action by that organization.

On Sunday, Ohio Gov. John Kasich on CNN’s State of the Union called for national leaders to step up and make changes while hinting he may support a ban on the sale of a weapon used in the Florida school shootings. Such a stance would constitute a major reversal for Kasich.

RELATED: Kasich bashes Congress, seeks common sense gun laws

Among the highlights in the pro-gun Buckeye Firearms Association’s statement:

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-Gun owners “ARE doing something. We’ve been doing something for years,” according to Dean Rieck, its executive director.

-The BFA has various activities “to directly address violence in schools, reduce suicides, promote gun safety, and support enforcement of gun laws.”

-One program - FASTER Saves Lives - provides educators with intensive violence response and trauma first aid training. Funded by private donations, more than 1,300 teachers and staff, including educators in 76 of Ohio’s 88 counties.

-The association provides training to deter or stop mass murderers in schools and works with the Ohio Department of Mental Health to promote suicide awareness and prevention.

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Among Kasich’s points:

-He has “no confidence” Congress will approve what he called “common sense gun laws” in the wake of the Florida mass shooting. He suggested President Trump should take the lead.

-Indicated he would support “reasonable things,” such as full background checks for people buying guns and banning what are known as bump stocks, which allow a semi-automatic weapon to fire like an automatic weapon.

-Still supports the Second Amendment, but wants legislators to examine reasonable steps “that can be done to answer these young people.”

-Said he thought it was possible to push for some measures at the state and local level, like background checks and increased attention to mental illness.

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