National Night Out returns to Butler County in August: What’s planned

Pictured is a previous photo from Middletown's National Night Out held in August 2017. Dozens of booths were set up from area agencies, and the Middletown Division of Police had demonstrations with police canines and the Special Response Team. NICK GRAHAM/FILE
Pictured is a previous photo from Middletown's National Night Out held in August 2017. Dozens of booths were set up from area agencies, and the Middletown Division of Police had demonstrations with police canines and the Special Response Team. NICK GRAHAM/FILE

Credit: Nick Graham

Credit: Nick Graham

National Night Out around Butler County will resume in just a few weeks after a year where most community activities were canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

More than 16,000 communities participate in the annual National Night Out, which started 38 years ago. Around 100 Ohio communities celebrate National Night Out, including Fairfield, Hamilton and Middletown in Butler County.

Last year, the annual National Night Out event was not held in any community due to the novel coronavirus pandemic. Middletown Division of Police Chief David Birk said that was “extremely difficult” to not have the city’s long-standing tradition.

“National Night Out is an important event in Middletown because it is an opportunity to give back to the community and show that officers can be seen as a partner and someone to turn to,” he said. “National Night Out is such a large event for the community, something everyone at Middletown police department looks forward to.”

The official National Night Out is on Aug. 3, and Middletown will host its event from 5 to 9 p.m. at Smith Park, 500 Tytus Ave. A few thousand people typically attend.

Fairfield will run its National Night Out from 6 to 9 p.m. on Aug. 3 at the Justice Center, 5320 Pleasant Ave. MICHAEL D. PITMAN / STAFF 2017
Fairfield will run its National Night Out from 6 to 9 p.m. on Aug. 3 at the Justice Center, 5320 Pleasant Ave. MICHAEL D. PITMAN / STAFF 2017

Not all will resume hosting its National Night Out. The city of Monroe will not host one this year after holding one in 2019.

Fairfield will run its National Night Out from 6 to 9 p.m. on Aug. 3 at the Justice Center, 5320 Pleasant Ave. Fairfield police Officer Doug Day said National Night Out events ― or similar community-based events in other communities ― are “huge, especially in light of the environment we’re in today.”

“The reality is, it takes the whole city to keep the community safe, not just one part of it,” he said. “That’s really what this is about.”

Fairfield has seen several hundred people attend, but with no National Night Out events in 2020, Day said he believes this year’s event will see a larger crowd. But Fairfield won’t be the only law enforcement at its National Night Out. Fairfield Twp., Miami University and Springdale police departments, the Ohio State Highway Patrol, and Butler County Sheriff’s Office have been invited to attend.

Fairfield Twp. Police Sgt. Brandon McCroskey said the township intends to hold its own National Night Out in 2022, but was difficult with the remodeling and expansion of the police department, and other activities He said the department is making more efforts to have more community-based events.

“It’s a multi-tiered purpose because we want to show the community what we’re doing, and interact with them and show support,” McCroskey.

The township will have a touch-a-truck event featuring police, fire, and public works vehicles scheduled for Aug. 21 at Bridgewater Falls, and there will be a Fairfield Twp. police booth at the Butler County Fair.

Hamilton’s National Night Out, which is at its 331 S. Front St., is set for later in the week from 5 to 8 p.m. on Aug. 5.

Hamilton will host its next National Night Out event on Aug. 5.
Hamilton will host its next National Night Out event on Aug. 5.

“Of course it is important for us to pick up where we left off and continue this and make it better than it has been in the past,” said Hamilton officer Kristy Collins. “We love our community and want them to be a part of this and to also see what we are doing as a police department.”

Several hundred to 1,000 people typically attend this event.

“We missed interacting with the community and seeing everyone, but we had to do what had to be done for the safety of everyone around us,” Collins said.

ajc.com

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