This Hamilton group helps older and disabled residents stay in their homes. Now they have more money to do it.

The Cincinnati-based non-profit organization called People Working Cooperatively, partnered with UPS in 2016 to complete projects to help local homeowners in Middletown. Volunteers built a wheelchair ramp for a Middletown couple who struggled with their mobility. PROVIDED
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The Cincinnati-based non-profit organization called People Working Cooperatively, partnered with UPS in 2016 to complete projects to help local homeowners in Middletown. Volunteers built a wheelchair ramp for a Middletown couple who struggled with their mobility. PROVIDED

The Hamilton Community Foundation has given $30,000 to the nonprofit organization People Working Cooperatively to support home modifications and repairs in Hamilton.

“We’re so grateful for the support of the Hamilton Community Foundation, and the opportunity to make a greater impact for low-income and elderly homeowners and people with disabilities in the city of Hamilton,” said Chris Owens, PWC’s vice president of development.

“It’s through partnerships with organizations like the Hamilton Community Foundation that we’re able to help keep these neighbors in need safe in their homes, where they truly want to be.”

John Guidugli, president and CEO of the foundation, said his public charity awarded the grant “because they provide such a valuable service to individuals and families in our community.

“PWC services allow area homeowners to get needed repairs completed, making it possible for the residents to remain in their homes and maintain their independence.”

Further, Guidugli said, “PWC is a quality organization and they offer very cost efficient services. They collaborate with other organizations to serve the community.”

People wanting to learn more about People Working Cooperatively, or interested in finding out if they qualify for services can visit www.pwchomerepairs.org or call 513-351-7921.

PWC was incorporated in 1975 and is a nonprofit organization that serves the elderly, low-income people and disabled homeowners in 20 counties of southwestern Ohio, Northern Kentucky. In the past 43 years, its staff and group of 3,500 volunteers have helped more than 320,000 people.