Fairfield’s Ohio 4 repaving project underway

Ohio 4 will be paved from the Seward Road to the northern corporation line with Hamilton. The nearly 4.5-mile stretch will paved beginning in June, and curb and gutter replacement work is now underway along most of the state highway. MICHAEL D. PITMAN/FILE

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Ohio 4 will be paved from the Seward Road to the northern corporation line with Hamilton. The nearly 4.5-mile stretch will paved beginning in June, and curb and gutter replacement work is now underway along most of the state highway. MICHAEL D. PITMAN/FILE

Motorists are navigating orange cones as curbs and gutters are being replaced along many areas within a 4.5-mile stretch of Ohio 4.

But then the real headaches begin when the road will be repaved this summer.

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“Preliminary activity is underway now,” said Fairfield City Engineer Ben Mann.

In all about 8,000 feet of curb will be installed replacing a lot of shoulder-based failures and base failures in front of the curb. There are also some catch basins that are being rebuilt.

Then come June, Mann said that’s when paving will begin.

The city approved earlier this year a nearly $3.5 million repaving contract with John R. Jurgenson to repave Ohio 4 from Seward Road to the northern corporation line with Hamilton, just north of the railroad overpass.

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This is the third consecutive year Ohio 4 has experienced a significant project impacting traffic.

In 2016, the intersection of Holden Boulevard/South Gilmore Road and Ohio 4 was realigned, and Duke Energy did some utility work near that intersection. In 2017, the water main under a 2-mile stretch of Ohio 4 — from Nilles Road to Bypass Ohio 4 — was replaced.

The city won't need to touch Ohio 4 again until 2022 or 2023 when the Michael Lane/Camelot Drive intersection on Ohio 4 is realigned.

The need for the repaving is significant, Mann said. He said the biggest concern was a bad subgrade. Water can become trapped under the pavement as it gets worn down with the 45,000 cars and trucks that travel the road every day.

There will also be a modification to the Ohio 4 intersection at Bypass Ohio 4. Mann said because there were too many accidents, the right-turn yield land will be removed for traffic heading north on Ohio 4 to eastbound on the bypass.

The Ohio Department of Transportation is helping pay for the project. Fairfield will chip in $2 million while the city will receive a $1.6 million urban paving program grant and a $50,000 state safety grant.

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