Lakota eyes plans for revamped summer school to help students who fell behind

During a work session meeting of the Lakota Board of Education Thursday evening, district leaders presented an assessment of how the coronvavirus has impacted the 16,800-student district. The report also included plans for how the district will proceed with summer school and into the next school year. (Photo by Michael D. Clark\Journal-News)
During a work session meeting of the Lakota Board of Education Thursday evening, district leaders presented an assessment of how the coronvavirus has impacted the 16,800-student district. The report also included plans for how the district will proceed with summer school and into the next school year. (Photo by Michael D. Clark\Journal-News)

Members of Lakota Schools’ governing board got a first look Thursday evening at an assessment of how the district is faring about two thirds of the way through a school year rocked by the coronavirus.

Included in Lakota district officials’ presentation, during a board work session shown live online, were also some indications on how the 16,800-student school system plans to conduct summer school and move into the next school year.

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Highlights of the “covid impact report” included plans for a split session summer school with the first half dedicated largely to helping students who fell behind academically this school year to catch up.

The second half of summer school will also be focused on helping students make a productive transition into the start of the 2021-2022 school year.

“It’s a unique year,” Lakota Superintendent Matt Miller told the board referring to the sweeping impacts the pandemic has had on the current school year.

Lakota school board member Brad Lovell said “there are a ton of lessons learned … due to the pandemic.”

The popularity of the district’s Virtual Learning Option (VLO), where students learn online remotely from home, will also see the program extended into the next school year, Keith Koehne, executive director of curriculum and instruction, told the board.