Fairfield: We hear our residents who want more walking, biking

Fairfield contracted on Monday, Dec. 2, 2019, Dayton-based Market Metrics to study and evaluate the northern Ohio 4 corridor in hopes to spark development to revitalize the area. MICHAEL D. PITMAN/STAFF
Fairfield contracted on Monday, Dec. 2, 2019, Dayton-based Market Metrics to study and evaluate the northern Ohio 4 corridor in hopes to spark development to revitalize the area. MICHAEL D. PITMAN/STAFF

Fairfield is seeking community input on how to better connect the city, a project that’s emerged from the recently overhauled comprehensive plan.

Those who live in, work in or visit the city are asked to participate in the Fairfield Connects online survey to help the administration identify ways to improve access to walking and biking in travel throughout the city, said City Councilwoman Leslie Besl.

ONLINE: Take the Fairfield Connects survey

Residents indicated they wanted more sidewalks and biking and walking trails and paths, and safer pedestrian routes during the city’s development of its comprehensive plan, Fairfield Forward, which City Council approved Monday night. The Fairfield Connects initiative is a result of the comprehensive plan.

Fairfield Planning Manager Erin Lynn, Development Service Director Greg Kathman and department staff worked with Jacob’s Engineering on the plan since August 2018. Fairfield first adopted a comprehensive plan in 1966, and it was last updated in 2009.

“Fairfield Forward is a dynamic policy-level document that will be used in making decisions related to zoning and planning, capital improvement projects, economic development projects for the next 10 to 20 years,” Lynn said.

The city paid Jacobs $115,640, of which $5,000 is funded through a grant from the Duke Energy Foundation.

LOCAL NEWS: Fairfield eyes future of struggling section of northern Ohio 4 corridor

City Council agreed to a $12,000 contract with Dayton-based Market Metrics to study the northern section of Ohio 4, which City Manager Mark Wendling said the area has experienced blight and “it’s struggling.”

The project will study Ohio 4 north of Nilles Road to the corporation line with Hamilton. The contract includes Market Metrics analyzing four land-use groups: industrial, office, residential and retail. Kathman said the study would provide the city with “objective opinions regarding the types of land uses that are appropriate for the corridor and can be supported by the local market.”