UD prof: Speed camera ruling a ‘good argument’ for fine refunds

New Miami’s former speed program was deemed unconstitutional in 2014, when a Butler County judge banned its use and granted the case class-action status, meaning thousands of other motorists who had been cited could join a lawsuit and seek a legal remedy. GREG LYNCH / STAFF

caption arrowCaption
New Miami’s former speed program was deemed unconstitutional in 2014, when a Butler County judge banned its use and granted the case class-action status, meaning thousands of other motorists who had been cited could join a lawsuit and seek a legal remedy. GREG LYNCH / STAFF

A judge ordered a community repay people's speeding ticket fines totaling $3 million.

Legal experts say they could impact drivers in other towns with speed cameras.

The city of Dayton is one of six communities in our area that have speed cameras. They’re effectively banned under a new state law so most of them have gone dark.

New Miami’s speed cameras were ruled unconstitutional in 2014, and a local legal expert says this ruling could signal some green back in the wallets of folks.

"I think it's very possible if the Ohio Supreme Court comes down and says 'OK, this stature authorizing this type of conduct was unconstitutional', then there'd be a perfectly good, legal argument that they deserve their money back,” said Tom Hagel, professor emeritus at University of Dayton School of Law.

Jodi York of Union City was driving from Hamilton through New Miami when she got a ticket a couple years ago. She’s still hoping to get her $98 back.

“Right before you get to New Miami, it's 55 miles an hour, and then without warning, if you don't know the town or that particular part of that intersection, it'll drop to 35,” York said. "The people deserve their money back because I felt that was a speed trap zone."

A ruling from the Ohio Supreme Court is expected sometime this year on Dayton’s red light camera.

DOWNLOAD OUR MOBILE APPS FOR LATEST BREAKING NEWS

About the Author