Talbott Moon

Incumbent Middletown councilman says he’ll continue push for roads, public safety

“This is a great community,” Moon said. “I want to leave Middletown better than I found it.”

The Euclid Street resident is seeking re-election to a second four-year term on Middletown City Council and is one of six candidates seeking one of the two open seats this fall. Moon, 38, is also serving his second year as vice mayor. As a business owner of an insurance agency for the past 11 years, he said understands the challenges and successes the city has faced and has continued to build relationships in the region.

“I have a track record of keeping promises,” Moon said. “I promised to work on subsidized housing (issue) and I will continue to push for road paving, funding for public safety and strategically locating our fire stations.”

MORE: Read more on the candidates on the Journal-News Voter Guide

A fifth-generation Middletonian, Moon said the most pressing issue facing the city is economic development growth.

“It drives our budget and helps to provide more revenues for additional funding for public safety and streets,” Moon said. “The East End should drive higher-paying job growth. We need to market the area as a whole and a comprehensive growth study will help drive development.”

Moon said as Cincinnati and Dayton continue to grow toward each other, there will be a need for affordable housing. He also said developing workforce development programs will also be critical.

He said road paving would be the next-highest priority noting the city will be receiving about $1 million in additional revenues from the state gas tax hike in July and the city will be paying off a bond that could free up an additional $800,000.

Moon is also proposing to earmark 5 to 10 percent of the city’s 1.5 percent income tax revenues (excluding the already dedicated 0.25 percent for public safety) for road paving. He also said the city might want to look at raising the permissive road tax to license plate sales in Middletown to be used for paving.

Another idea Moon suggested at a recent candidate forum was to pattern the 17 Strong neighborhood program that is being implemented in Hamilton as a way for Middletown’s neighborhoods to collaborate with city officials to improve the city.

As for the homeless issue, Moon said the city should reach out to the Butler and Warren county commissions as well as the state to seek out funding for recovery housing for the homeless. He also said creating a Special Improvement District for the downtown district where downtown properties are assessed might be another way to cover the costs for more security and address the homeless issue.

Middletown City Council members receive $5,000 per year in compensation during their four-year term of office.

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