Coronavirus: Ohio reports more than 100 deaths for second straight day

Public Health - Dayton Montgomery County hosted free pop-up coronavirus testing at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds on Monday, July 20, 2020. STAFF PHOTO / JIM NOELKER
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Public Health - Dayton Montgomery County hosted free pop-up coronavirus testing at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds on Monday, July 20, 2020. STAFF PHOTO / JIM NOELKER

Ohio record more than 100 deaths attributed to coronavirus for the second straight day Wednesday. The state reported 119 deaths Tuesday and 123 Wednesday, bringing Ohio’s total to 6,671, according to the Ohio Department of Health.

Over the last 21 days the state has reported an average of 50 deaths a day.

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Gov. Mike DeWine has previously noted that daily death data notes when ODH is informed of the death and does not reflect the day a person died.

Hospitalizations increased by 436 Wednesday for a total of 27,885. There are 5,208 COVID-19 patients in Ohio hospitals, slightly down from the 5,234 reported on Tuesday.

ODH has reported more than 5,000 coronavirus patients in Ohio hospitals for three days in a row. It’s the first time the state has surpassed the 5,000 mark during the pandemic. On Nov. 1, Ohio was just under 1,700 COVID-19 inpatients.

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In southwest Ohio, there are 1,297 coronavirus patients in hospitals, 295 in the ICU and 206 on ventilators. Statewide, there 52 ICU admissions reported Wednesday for a total of 4,781.

Cases increased by 7,835, slightly below the 21-day average of 8,122. There have been 437,928 cases of coronavirus reported in Ohio throughout the pandemic.

Ohio’s seven-day case positivity surpassed 15% as of Monday, which 18.9% positivity reported for that day, according to ODH. It is the highest seven-day positivity rate for the state since April 24 and double the 7% weekly rate reported on Nov. 1.

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