Chamber hopes to match people with companies seeking employees through ‘common language’

Rick Pearce, president of the Chamber of Commerce serving Middletown, Monroe and Trenton, talks about a new initiative to connect individuals with employers during the chamber’s annual dinner Thursday night at the Windamere Event Center. CONTRIBUTED

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Rick Pearce, president of the Chamber of Commerce serving Middletown, Monroe and Trenton, talks about a new initiative to connect individuals with employers during the chamber’s annual dinner Thursday night at the Windamere Event Center. CONTRIBUTED

Chamber President Rick Pearce touts ‘ground breaking’ technology at annual meeting

The president of the Chamber of Commerce serving Middletown, Monroe and Trenton has implemented “ground breaking” technology that brings a common language of skill sets to employers, individuals and educators.

That was the message from Chamber President Rick Pearce during the Chamber’s annual meeting Thursday night at the Windamere event venue in Middletown.

One of the objectives of the technology is to get four industry sectors, including manufacturing, healthcare, logistics, and finance and insurance, speaking “a common language,” he said.

Pearce and the board discovered that Emsi, a labor market data company based in Idaho, had a database of more than 30,000 words that describe the skills needed for any position, he said.

Emsi’s mission is to use labor market data to inform and connect people, education and employers, said Josh Wright, executive vice president of Workforce and Economic Development. His company has spent 20 years harnessing labor market data and creating tools to support economic prosperity, he said.

For the past 50 years, employers have posted positions based on job titles and job seekers were confused about all the various job titles that employers used due to their “unique cultures,” according to Pearce.

He said the chamber works with employers and helps them identify the skill set needed for all of their positions.

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Skills2Careers then helps individuals build their skill profile that aligns with those skills needed by employers. The program also uses technology and artificial intelligence to scan the syllabi, course descriptions and curriculum of education to return a set of skills from classes and courses, according to Pearce, president of the chamber since 2013.

“Once this happens, we have taken the friction out of the process and all the parties involved know the skills they needed, the skills they have, and the skills they teach,” he said.

Skills2Careers was introduced in February 2021 and continues to be upgraded and it will become more effective as technology improves, he said.

Skills2Careers also has the ability to help with career exploration for students. They can identify the skills they have a learn for future employment and align that with an educational institution that can provide those skills, he said.

Pearce said Middletown, Monroe, Madison and Edgewood schools districts are aware of the technology. The pilot program is being used in Nevada and Middletown, said Bob Sommers, from CF Educational Solutions.

The goal is to prepare students for “life after high school” regardless of their career path, Pearce said.

“Skills2Careers is the next generation talent/job search tool and we’re very excited to be able to introduce this technology to our employers,” he said.


OUTGOING CHAMBER BOARD MEMBERS

Dick Lange: Joe Morgan Honda

Tom Scott: McGraw/Kokosing

INCOMING CHAMBER BOARD MEMBERS

Shannon Bannerman: Riley’s Furniture

Ande Durojaiye: Miami Regionals

Rhonda Seidenschmidt: Atrium Medical Center

Bob Sommers: CF Educational Solutions

2022 CHAIR

Rob Zielsdorf: Cohen

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