Carlisle schools puts $20M bond issue on May ballot

Bobby F. Grigsby Intermediate School would be one of four buildings demolished and replaced with a new K-12 building. The Carlisle Board of Education on Thursday, Jan. 26, approved placing a new a 6.2-mill bond issue on the May 2, 2017, special election ballot. ED RICHTER/STAFF

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Bobby F. Grigsby Intermediate School would be one of four buildings demolished and replaced with a new K-12 building. The Carlisle Board of Education on Thursday, Jan. 26, approved placing a new a 6.2-mill bond issue on the May 2, 2017, special election ballot. ED RICHTER/STAFF

Voters in the Carlisle Local School District will decide if the district should build a new K-12 building with the state paying nearly 60 percent.

The Carlisle Board of Education met in a special meeting Thursday morning and unanimously approved the resolution to proceed with place a 6.2-mill bond issue on the May 2 special election ballot, said Superintendent Larry Hook.

According to the Warren County Auditor’s Office, it will cost the owner of a home valued at $100,000 about $217 a year for 37 years.

Taxpayers are paying about 12.5 percent more on new bond issues and tax levies because the state eliminated the rollback credits and homestead exemptions, according to the Auditor’s Office and Hook.

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If approved, the bond issue would raise more than $20.2 million toward the nearly $49 million project. Hook said the Ohio School Facilities Commission would cover 59 percent, or about $28.7 million, of the project’s costs.

Of the district’s 41 percent of the local costs, about $13.5 million would go for the building costs and nearly $6.75 million would go for locally funded initiatives for the project that the OSFC does not cover such as equipment, furnishings, site improvements, etc.

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Hook said the new K-12 building would have wings to separate the grade levels and would replace the four buildings currently in use. Hook said the project would include a 500-seat auditorium and would also include furnishings, landscaping, widening Jamaica Road to three lanes and other upgrades and site improvements, and demolition of the current buildings.

He said there is a group of citizens that will be involved in the levy campaign. Hook has previously said there would be community meetings and forums to discuss the project and to get community feedback.

The district tried unsuccessfully to pass an 8.53-mill bond issue for a new facility about five years ago.

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