State approves entertainment district in Lebanon to boost downtown

These are the boundaries for a Community Entertainment District that the Ohio Division of Liquor Control recently approved for the city of Lebanon, It will allow additional D-5J liquor permits in the district to help attract new restaurants to the city. Lebanon City Council approved expanding its Designated Outdoor Refreshment Area or DORA to match the new CED boundaries. CONTRIBUTED/CITY OF LEBANON
These are the boundaries for a Community Entertainment District that the Ohio Division of Liquor Control recently approved for the city of Lebanon, It will allow additional D-5J liquor permits in the district to help attract new restaurants to the city. Lebanon City Council approved expanding its Designated Outdoor Refreshment Area or DORA to match the new CED boundaries. CONTRIBUTED/CITY OF LEBANON

The Ohio Division of Liquor Control has accepted and approved Lebanon’s application to establish a community entertainment district for its downtown area and recently expanded outdoor drinking area.

The entertainment district is part of Lebanon’s continued effort to support new investment within downtown and the surrounding community, city officials said.

Downtown Lebanon has a thriving business district that encompasses a collection of restaurants, retail, entertainment, educational, arts, sporting, social and cultural establishments. The entertainment district will allow 15 additional liquor permits for new restaurants within the district.

ExploreLebanon considering new entertainment district to help restaurants

Other cities and areas such as Monroe, Austin Landing, Huber Heights and The Greene have created these districts in recent years.

The nearly 95 acre Downtown Lebanon entertainment district includes the North Broadway corridor that encompasses new developments, including the 511 North Broadway mixed­ use development under construction.

The CED will allow Lebanon to offer restaurant-driven liquor permits at a low fixed price to entrepreneurs in lieu of the prospective restaurant being placed on a waitlist or shopping the open market for a permit, city officials said.

Lebanon City Council discussed the application in April before it was submitted to the state. At that time, Jason Millard, city economic development director, said it is “a tool to help facilitate new restaurants and other similar establishments as part of larger scale development and redevelopment areas.”

ExploreLebanon expands outdoor drinking district to match proposed entertainment area

He said the city has identified $50.8 million in planned investment, including 17 projects over the next 10 years inside the boundaries.

“This will help bring in new quality restaurants,” Mayor Amy Brewer said during that discussion. “We need to take advantage as development is occurring.”

Council members also expanded the outside drinking area boundaries to match the entertainment district boundaries.