Coronavirus: Under 1,000 cases reported for first time in weeks

Free walk-up coronavirus testing was available the old Greene County career technology Center near Xenia Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020, in partnership with Public Health Greene County. STAFF/MARSHALL GORBY
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Free walk-up coronavirus testing was available the old Greene County career technology Center near Xenia Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020, in partnership with Public Health Greene County. STAFF/MARSHALL GORBY

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The Ohio Department of Health reported 873 new coronavirus cases on Sunday, the lowest number of cases reported in the past three weeks. The current 21 day case average is 1,919 cases per day, the Ohio Department of Health reported.

Since the beginning of the pandemic over a year ago, the state has reported 1,064,306 cases.

In the past 24 hours, 21,595 people have started their vaccine dose, bringing the vaccinated population in Ohio to 39.09%, the Ohio Department of Health reported. A total of 4,569,422 people in Ohio have started their vaccine dose and 3,512,118 people have completed their dose. In the past 24 hours, 47,363 people have completed their vaccine dose, bringing the fully vaccinated Ohio population to 30.05%, the ODH reported.

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The Ohio Hospital Association reported that 1,178 people are currently hospitalized with COVID-19, down from yesterday’s total of nearly 1,200 people. In the past seven days, patients who have tested positive for COVID-19 have decreased by 11%, the Ohio Hospital Association said. In southwest Ohio, 230 people are currently hospitalized for COVID-19. In the past 24 hours, 44 people have been hospitalized.

Breweries across the U.S. and Ohio, including in Dayton, had to adapt quickly to survive the calamitous effects of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Some of those changes are likely lasting, according to Nick Bowman, co-founder and vice president of sales at Warped Wing Brewing Co. in Dayton.

“Everyone’s going to be forever changed and think about their business differently because if this happens again, you have to be a little bit diversified in your business model,” Bowman said. “I think a lot of people learned that to be able to survive something like this.”

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