Reds bullpen perfecto recalls that time Babe Ruth was ejected for assaulting an umpire

393274 05: A vintage photo and practice bat belonging to legendary ballplayer Herman "Babe" Ruth sit on a table August 15, 2001 during a press conference to announce a public initiative to honor Ruth in Boston, MA. Ruth led the 1918 Red Sox to a World Series, but was traded the following year to the rival New York Yankees. Since then the Red Sox have gone 82 seasons without another championship. The drought has become known locally as the "Curse of the Bambino." The public initiative to honor Ruth is also designed to lift the curse. Red Sox management have never honored Ruth and will not participate in the September ceremony. (Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images)
Caption
393274 05: A vintage photo and practice bat belonging to legendary ballplayer Herman "Babe" Ruth sit on a table August 15, 2001 during a press conference to announce a public initiative to honor Ruth in Boston, MA. Ruth led the 1918 Red Sox to a World Series, but was traded the following year to the rival New York Yankees. Since then the Red Sox have gone 82 seasons without another championship. The drought has become known locally as the "Curse of the Bambino." The public initiative to honor Ruth is also designed to lift the curse. Red Sox management have never honored Ruth and will not participate in the September ceremony. (Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images)

Credit: Darren McCollester

Credit: Darren McCollester

The Cincinnati Reds' bullpen performance Monday night in Pittsburgh was not just impressive – it was historic, too.

Jamie Ramsey of the Reds media relations staff points out that in throwing seven shutout innings against the Pirates, they became the second team in the last 100 seasons to get at least seven perfect innings from their bullpen.

That is significant to sports nerds (like me) because it brings up one of the more amazing games ever played in Major League Baseball.

On June 23, 1917, a young Red Sox pitcher named Babe Ruth (perhaps you’ve heard of him) was part of a combined no-hitter against the Washington Senators.

Ruth was only around for one batter, though, because he was ejected for arguing with and then assaulting the umpire after the first batter of the game walked.

Ernie Shore came on to relieve Ruth, and – after the man who had walked was thrown out trying to steal second – he retired all 26 batters he faced.

I guess that’s one way to get a no-hitter....

Anyway, the Red Sox won 4-0.

No one has since matched Shore’s feat, but the Cubs bullpen also set down 21 batters in a row to close a game last May.

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