DeWine, Whaley raise the most in their party primaries for 2022 governor race

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley received the most campaign contributions in the race for Ohio governor during the first half of 2021. In this 2019 file photo DeWine and Whaley participate in a forum about gun violence in the wake of the Aug. 4 mass shooting in Dayton's Oregon District.. BILL LACKEY/STAFF
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Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley received the most campaign contributions in the race for Ohio governor during the first half of 2021. In this 2019 file photo DeWine and Whaley participate in a forum about gun violence in the wake of the Aug. 4 mass shooting in Dayton's Oregon District.. BILL LACKEY/STAFF

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine leads the pack in fundraising for the 2022 Ohio governor’s race, followed by Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, according to semi-annual campaign finance reports filed with the Ohio Secretary of State.

DeWine, a Republican, raised $3.08 million in his re-election campaign during the six-month reporting period ending June 30. His campaign said 96 percent of contributions came from Ohioans.

DeWine has nearly $6.6 million on hand, including a $4 million loan he made to his campaign.

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“The significant grassroots backing that the campaign has received is proof that Ohioans support Governor DeWine’s leadership,” said campaign manager Brenton Temple. “Our campaign is in a strong position heading into next November. We appreciate the groundswell of support from all over Ohio.”

Whaley, a Democrat, received $1.64 million in contributions during the reporting period. She has almost $1.4 million on hand and no debt.

Whaley’s campaign said 80.5 percent of contributions came from Ohioans and money came from all 88 Ohio counties.

“(Whaley’s) fundraising total demonstrates the far-reaching support of Nan’s vision for Ohio’s future,” said John Hagner, campaign manager. “Our campaign doesn’t rely on contributions from special interests with deep pockets or shady fundraising tactics — we’re powered by a grassroots coalition of supporters who know that Ohio deserves better than the status quo of a pay-to-play culture that’s plagued us for so long.”

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Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley, also a Democrat, raised $1.07 million and he has $1.3 million on hand and no debt.

“Ohio Democrats will judge the candidates based on their experience, plans and ideas to end one party Republican rule in Columbus,” according to a statement issued by Cranley’s campaign. “Mayor Cranley delivered a comeback in Cincinnati and he is prepared to do the same in Ohio with innovative plans and big ideas.”

Amounts on hand include money raised prior to the current reporting period.

The other candidates for governor who filed reports are Joe Blystone of Canal Winchester, who received $258,836, and former U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci of Wadsworth, who raised $21,959. Both are Republicans.

Blystone, founder of Blystone Farm, reported $134,909 on hand and no debt.

Renacci’s campaign reported having just more than $1 million on hand, including a $1 million loan he made to his campaign.

“After entering the race in June just three weeks before fundraising reports were due, the campaign is on pace to raise the necessary funds needed to take on Mike DeWine and his special interest backers,” according to a statement from the campaign. “Small dollar donations from everyday Ohioans and everyday Americans across this country have powered the campaign thus far.”

Renacci ran unsuccessfully for U.S. Senate in 2018, losing to U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio. Renacci also ran for governor that year but dropped out before running for the senate seat.

Blystone could not be reached for comment.

Also on Monday a spokesman for U.S. Rep. Warren Davidson, R-Troy, confirmed information reported by Cleveland.com that Davidson is considering a run for Ohio governor.

“The Congressman has been inundated with request from around the state, including from elected officials, to run for governor,” said Adam Hewitt, spokesman for Davidson.

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