Middletown will work on 12 streets as part of $269M sewer improvement plan

These are the streets are where the city of Middletown will reline the sewer lines later this fall. CONTRIBUTED/CITY OF MIDDLETOWN
These are the streets are where the city of Middletown will reline the sewer lines later this fall. CONTRIBUTED/CITY OF MIDDLETOWN

The city of Middletown will be doing infrastructure improvements on about a dozen streets this fall.

Middletown City Council on Tuesday awarded a $335,284 contract to Miller Pipeline LLC to reline the sanitary sewers on portions of 12 streets.

Council approved the ordinance as an emergency measure to give the contractor enough time to complete the work before the end of the 2020 construction season.

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The annual project will add support inside defective sanitary sewer mains , according to Scott Tadych, director of public works and utilities.

Tadych said the city had already appropriated the amount in the 2020 Capital Improvement Budget.

Tadych recently told council that the city has been doing this annually for about 20 years.

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The streets identified for the infrastructure work include:

  • Avalon Drive
  • Auburn Street
  • Crescent Boulevard
  • Elwood Street
  • Erie Avenue
  • Germantown Road
  • Goldman Avenue
  • Highland Street
  • Hughes Street
  • Van Avenue
  • Wilmore Drive
  • Yankee Road

The city has been working on other sanitary sewer projects this year such as the repairs and replacements on the North Interceptor Sewer Line.

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Tadych said the costs of sewer relining project will count toward Middletown’s 25-year, $269 million Long Term Control Plan with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The city will construct storage basins and other improvements to its sewer system and sewage treatment plant to reduce untreated sewer overflows. That settlement between Middletown and the EPA was finalized in early 2018.

According to the EPA, the city discharged millions of gallons of untreated sewage each year from its sewer system during and after rain events through its eight “combined sewer overflow” outfalls.

Tadych said the $10 million to $12 million Lakeside Stormwater Redirection Project is next on the list of projects in the Long Term Control Plan was identified to reduce the storm water contribution to the combined sewer system from the Lakeside drainage area.