137,405 cases of coronavirus, 4,415 deaths reported in Ohio

Public Health - Dayton Montgomery County hosted free pop-up coronavirus testing at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds on Monday, July 20, 2020. STAFF PHOTO / JIM NOELKER
Caption
Public Health - Dayton Montgomery County hosted free pop-up coronavirus testing at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds on Monday, July 20, 2020. STAFF PHOTO / JIM NOELKER

There have been 137,405 cases of coronavirus and 4,415 deaths from COVID-19 reported in Ohio as of Sunday, September 13, the Ohio Department of Health reported. A total of 837 new cases and four deaths were reported in the past 24 hours.

130,196 cases and 4,122 deaths have been confirmed by the state. 30 new hospitalizations were reported, raising the total hospitalizations to 14,314. No intensive care unit admissions were reported today. Since the beginning of the pandemic, a total of 3,088 ICU admissions were reported. The state estimates that 114,906 people have recovered.

The University of Dayton reported one new case yesterday, raising the total number of cases to 1,205 and the total active cases to 104. The campus is currently at status three, caution. In-person classes are expected to resume Wednesday.

ExploreSix months of coronavirus; where are we now?

Six months ago, Ohio came to a halt. Only 36 coronavirus cases were confirmed in the state and no deaths were reported. But Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, seeing the effects of COVID-19 elsewhere, shut down schools and businesses statewide.

Every Dayton-area employer is finding its own equilibrium in the new reality created by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Workforces generally are smaller, but there are some comforting constants. Among them: Wright-Patterson Air Force Base remains the region and the state’s largest single site employer. That hasn’t changed, said Col. Patrick Miller, who was installed as Wright-Patterson’s commander June 12.

The base still has about 30,000 military and civilian employees, Miller said in his first meeting with the Dayton Daily News last week.

About the Author

ajc.com