Top 10 stories you might have missed during the holidays

The Homebound for the Holidays Neighborhood Lights & Display contest features decorated homes in the Huffman Historic Area, St. Anne's Hill Historic District and the Oregon Historic District. Voting categories for the displays are: Traditional, Clark Griswold, Santa Land & Festive Fun. Voting for favorite displays is open until Jan. 2, 2021 via a link on each historic district’s Facebook pages. TOM GILLIAM / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

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The Homebound for the Holidays Neighborhood Lights & Display contest features decorated homes in the Huffman Historic Area, St. Anne's Hill Historic District and the Oregon Historic District. Voting categories for the displays are: Traditional, Clark Griswold, Santa Land & Festive Fun. Voting for favorite displays is open until Jan. 2, 2021 via a link on each historic district’s Facebook pages. TOM GILLIAM / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The holidays are a busy time for everyone, here are some stories you might have missed while celebrating last week.


Archdeacon: A Christmas miracle for Moraine man fighting cancer

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Dave and Rosie Miller on a boat excursion to see 26 glaciers in Alaska. CONTRIBUTED

Dave and Rosie Miller on a boat excursion to see 26 glaciers in Alaska. CONTRIBUTED

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Dave and Rosie Miller on a boat excursion to see 26 glaciers in Alaska. CONTRIBUTED

They had just finished a short trek along both the Pinnacle Ridge Trail – where she noted the Wright Brothers are said to have gotten the idea for their aircraft’s warped-wing design as they sat and watched birds fly by – and then walked through Deer Meadow Park, where her husband had helped put in a Frisbee golf course to honor their late son, Shane.

Now that they were back in their Moraine home – having shed their hiking shoes, but still feeling the reinvigoration that comes with a crisp winter walk – she had a little time to share some of their story.

And what a story it is.

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Despite his death to coronavirus, legacy to continue of local man who anonymously gave $35,000 to strangers at Christmastime

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Bob LeVeck (far right) with his son Chris and two of his grandchildren. Bob died from COVID in August. His family is struggling to get through their first Christmas without him. CONTRIBUTED

Bob LeVeck (far right) with his son Chris and two of his grandchildren. Bob died from COVID in August. His family is struggling to get through their first Christmas without him. CONTRIBUTED

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Bob LeVeck (far right) with his son Chris and two of his grandchildren. Bob died from COVID in August. His family is struggling to get through their first Christmas without him. CONTRIBUTED

A Miami County man’s tradition of Christmastime giving from the heart and wallet was halted when he died of the coronavirus, but Bob LeVeck’s family says that’s not the end of Bob’s blessings.

Bob and Mary LeVeck randomly gifted strangers $100 bills nearly 11 Christmas seasons.

All told, the Bethel Twp. couple shelled out more than $35,000 in cold hard Christmas cheer, son Chris LeVeck said.

“It is frustrating to see some people not taking (COVID) seriously, but I was in that same mindset, too. It’s not real until it’s your dad,” Bob LeVeck’s son says.

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Building collapses as demo work goes awry for new downtown high-rise apartments

Demolition work did not go as planned Monday at the former Wright State University Kettering Center in downtown Dayton.

Large metal beams, bricks, concrete and other building debris collapsed onto Monument Avenue, taking down RTA lines and heavily damaging a sculpture at RiverScape MetroPark across the street.

The new building will be six stories with 124 apartments, 4,500 square feet of ground level retail space and a parking garage, according to developers Crawford Hoying of Dublin, Ohio, and Woodard Development.

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Rike’s history lives on through a pair of reindeer in Oakwood

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The Rike's reindeer on display inside Bough Bend's library in Oakwood. Photo courtesy of Dr. Samia Borchers

The Rike's reindeer on display inside Bough Bend's library in Oakwood. Photo courtesy of Dr. Samia Borchers

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The Rike's reindeer on display inside Bough Bend's library in Oakwood. Photo courtesy of Dr. Samia Borchers

The history of Rike’s also lives on at Christmastime through Dr. Samia Borchers, a local dermatologist and Oakwood resident who has a private practice on Far Hills Avenue in Kettering.

Through her family, she also has multiple connections to the history of former businesses and the buildings that housed them in downtown Dayton.

This year, the Rike’s reindeer will be keeping a low profile for the holidays. “Last year, there were 550 people through our home in one day for the Oakwood Historical Society Holiday Home Tour. This year, there will be four! We plan to leave the reindeer up on the third floor, although they greeted us when we brought down our Christmas lights,” said Borchers.

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Dave Chappelle to open comedy club in former fire station in Yellow Springs

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Dave Chappelle will buy the old Yellow Springs fire station on Corry Street and turn it into a comedy club. CONTRIBUTED

Dave Chappelle will buy the old Yellow Springs fire station on Corry Street and turn it into a comedy club. CONTRIBUTED

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Dave Chappelle will buy the old Yellow Springs fire station on Corry Street and turn it into a comedy club. CONTRIBUTED

Dave Chappelle’s company will buy the old Yellow Springs fire station on Corry Street and turn it into a comedy club.

The Yellow Springs Development Corp. finalized an agreement to sell the Miami Twp. Fire Station to Iron Table Holdings LLC, according to an announcement of the deal released late Monday night. Iron Table Holdings is owned by Chappelle.

“We think this will bring a new class of jobs to town,” she said. “We also considered that (Chappelle) is a minority business owner, he has a history of employing minorities and he is a person who has a clear commitment to amplifying voices of color.”

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New restaurant to open in former Collier’s Family Restaurant location

A new family-owned restaurant is expected to open soon in the former Collier’s Family Restaurant location.

Studebaker’s Country Restaurant on 41, located at 2800 W. 1st St. in Springfield, will open in January, Curt Studebaker, the owner of the restaurant said.

Studebaker and his wife, Missy, own Studebaker’s Country Restaurant in New Carlisle and The Hill in Urbana.

“We will run the same menu as we have at the other two stores, but at the same time we want to incorporate some things that the Collier’s did that were successful for them,” Studebaker said.

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Dayton dad goes viral after posting photo of daughters’ new makeup skills

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Brad Cubbie, center, with his kids, Khole Burns, Braleigh Cubbie and Kane Cubbie. Courtesy Brad Cubbie.

Brad Cubbie, center, with his kids, Khole Burns, Braleigh Cubbie and Kane Cubbie. Courtesy Brad Cubbie.

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Brad Cubbie, center, with his kids, Khole Burns, Braleigh Cubbie and Kane Cubbie. Courtesy Brad Cubbie.

When Brad Cubbie, a Dayton resident, posted a photo on Christmas Day to his Twitter account of the makeup his daughters had done for him that day, he was expecting some laughs.

He wasn’t expecting to go viral.

Cubbie said he got his daughters, Khloe Burns, 10, and Braleigh Cubbie, 6, a few makeup pallets from Five Below for Christmas. He said he never buys his girls makeup and tells them women can be pretty without makeup, but they wanted to play with it.

They asked him if they could do his face, and he couldn’t say no, he said. After he posted the photo, “it just went viral.”

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Three Dayton eateries collaborate on new, one-of-a-kind pizza toppings

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Brian Johnson, left, co-founder of The Pizza Bandit, and Shane Anderson, Ghostlight Coffee owner, have made some delicious collaborations since the pandemic. CONTRIBUTED

Credit: CONTRIBUTED

Brian Johnson, left, co-founder of The Pizza Bandit, and Shane Anderson, Ghostlight Coffee owner, have made some delicious collaborations since the pandemic. CONTRIBUTED

Credit: CONTRIBUTED

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Brian Johnson, left, co-founder of The Pizza Bandit, and Shane Anderson, Ghostlight Coffee owner, have made some delicious collaborations since the pandemic. CONTRIBUTED

Credit: CONTRIBUTED

Credit: CONTRIBUTED

The Pizza Bandit pizza food truck, located at Yellow Cab Tavern at 700 E. Fourth St. in Dayton, is adding two new permanent pizza topping options to its menu in collaboration with two other Dayton-based restaurants.

Pizza Bandit customers can now order Chicken Head’s Mac Sauce and Ghostlight’s Harrisa Cream Cheese as toppings on any Pizza Bandit pie or slice.

The collaboration with both Ghostlight and Chicken Head has been months in the making, and the toppings have been tried and tested at a number of Pizza Bandit special events. The double collaboration was supposed to be announced earlier this week, but the “Xmas Eve Eve Gift” was pushed back to Saturday, Dec. 26 due to a mid-week pizza rush.

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Key benefits expire, shutdown looms as relief bill remains unsigned

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Monroe is considering a mandatory mask ordinance to help prevent the spread of coronavirus COVID-19. Last week, the Butler County Emergency Management Agency has partnered with fire departments around the county to make masks available Butler County residents. Carla Southard pics up masks for her family at the Fairfield Township Fire Department headquarters on Morris Road Friday, July 10, 2020. NICK GRAHAM / STAFF

Monroe is considering a mandatory mask ordinance to help prevent the spread of coronavirus COVID-19. Last week, the Butler County Emergency Management Agency has partnered with fire departments around the county to make masks available Butler County residents. Carla Southard pics up masks for her family at the Fairfield Township Fire Department headquarters on Morris Road Friday, July 10, 2020. NICK GRAHAM / STAFF

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Monroe is considering a mandatory mask ordinance to help prevent the spread of coronavirus COVID-19. Last week, the Butler County Emergency Management Agency has partnered with fire departments around the county to make masks available Butler County residents. Carla Southard pics up masks for her family at the Fairfield Township Fire Department headquarters on Morris Road Friday, July 10, 2020. NICK GRAHAM / STAFF

Some federal unemployment benefits expired Saturday night for millions of people as a COVID-19 relief bill remained unsigned by President Trump.

The relief bill waiting for Trump’s signature offers an extra $300-a-week in benefits through March 14.

A further potential complication: If Trump does not relent and sign the bill, the U.S. government runs out of money at midnight Dec. 28. If that happens, tens of thousands of workers could be furloughed, possibly affecting non-essential workers at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and across the federal government.

While the bill remains in limbo, $600 direct payments for qualifying adults and $600 for each dependent and child are on hold. Trump has urged Congress to raise those payments to $2,000.

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Pandemic, economy, protests dominate DeWine’s second year as Ohio governor. What does 2021 hold?

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Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine toured the Ohio Department of Health's Receipt, Store and Stage warehouse Nov. 30, 2020, to see the facility and review the process that will be used to redistribute the COVID-19 vaccine in Ohio.

Credit: CONTRIBUTED

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine toured the Ohio Department of Health's Receipt, Store and Stage warehouse Nov. 30, 2020, to see the facility and review the process that will be used to redistribute the COVID-19 vaccine in Ohio.

Credit: CONTRIBUTED

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Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine toured the Ohio Department of Health's Receipt, Store and Stage warehouse Nov. 30, 2020, to see the facility and review the process that will be used to redistribute the COVID-19 vaccine in Ohio.

Credit: CONTRIBUTED

Credit: CONTRIBUTED

Gov. Mike DeWine’s 2021 to-do list is long and heavy: overhaul Ohio’s foster care system, beef up police training and accountability, protect lakes and rivers, help struggling children and guide the state’s 11.7 million citizens through the backside of a deadly pandemic.

“We got a lot of things we want to get done. Part of it is getting Ohio through this virus and trying to minimize the damage — economic damage, damage to people’s health and to people’s lives. That’s really what the goal is,” DeWine said in an interview with the Dayton Daily News.

While most people are ready to say goodbye to 2020, the new year doesn’t magically erase the virus or economic struggles.

“The first few months, we anticipate are going to be tough because of the spread of the virus but the difference is there is hope. People are going to see people starting to get vaccinated,” the Greene County Republican said.

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