Decorating Easter eggs? Here are 11 colorful ideas

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7 Sweet Facts about Marshmallow Peeps

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Plain dyed Easter eggs? That’s so 1960s.

Why not take your egg decorating to a whole new level?

Below are a few suggestions on dying, marbling, polka-dotting, speckling and other kinds of Easter egg embellishment.

Before you start, use this tutorial to get the perfect hard-boiled egg.
1. Paint-splattered eggs
Do you like the splattered paint look? It's easy, albeit a bit messy, to do. Think paint on a small paintbrush and lots of flicking.

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2. The rice and food coloring method.
This is easier than flicking paint with just as interesting a result. Put about a cup of rice in a sandwich bag, add a few drops of food coloring – five or six drops – then close the bag tight. Let the kids shake the bag to coat the egg. Use gloves to get the egg out of the bag.
3. The Sharpie method
Who says you have to use dye to decorate an egg?
4. The polka dots method
Dye eggs your favorite color then glam them up by putting dots of glue all over them and sprinkling them with glitter. Shake off the excess glitter after they dry.
5. All-natural eggs
You do not have to use commercial dye pellets to color your eggs. You can use food, spices and peelings to get a more mellow-looking Easter egg.

>>Easter 101: Chart shows you how to get perfectly colored Easter eggs

6. Yarn-wrapped eggs
Wrap plastic eggs with colorful yarn in different patterns. You need eggs, glue and yarn.

7. Shaving cream eggs
A little shaving cream plus some dye and you can make Easter egg magic.

8. Emoji eggs
Let your inner texting Easter self out. Smiley face? Slightly grinning? Thumbs up? The sky is the limit when you have a yellow egg and some black paint.
9. Kool-Aid eggs
You can use liquid Kool-Aid mix to dye eggs in a swirling pattern. Kids will love it. 
10.  Sprinkles eggs
Think cupcake decorations – edible sprinkles – and you get the idea. Take your eggs, paint them with glue then roll them in sprinkles.
11. Dip-dyed eggs
Like that rainbow look on your Easter eggs? Here's how you can get it.

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SCHLEIFE, GERMANY - MARCH 17: Easter eggs painted by Kerstin Hanusch during the annual Sorbian Easter egg market at the Sorbian cultural center on March 17, 2018 in Schleife, Germany. Sorbians are a Slavic minority in eastern Germany who speak a language closely related to Czech and Polish. The Sorbian cultural calendar is rich in folklore, particularly at Easter in the Saxon region of Lower Lusatia. (Photo by Steffi Loos/Getty Images)

Credit: Steffi Loos

SCHLEIFE, GERMANY - MARCH 17: Easter eggs painted by Kerstin Hanusch during the annual Sorbian Easter egg market at the Sorbian cultural center on March 17, 2018 in Schleife, Germany. Sorbians are a Slavic minority in eastern Germany who speak a language closely related to Czech and Polish. The Sorbian cultural calendar is rich in folklore, particularly at Easter in the Saxon region of Lower Lusatia. (Photo by Steffi Loos/Getty Images)

Credit: Steffi Loos

Combined ShapeCaption
SCHLEIFE, GERMANY - MARCH 17: Easter eggs painted by Kerstin Hanusch during the annual Sorbian Easter egg market at the Sorbian cultural center on March 17, 2018 in Schleife, Germany. Sorbians are a Slavic minority in eastern Germany who speak a language closely related to Czech and Polish. The Sorbian cultural calendar is rich in folklore, particularly at Easter in the Saxon region of Lower Lusatia. (Photo by Steffi Loos/Getty Images)

Credit: Steffi Loos

Credit: Steffi Loos

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