Solar eclipse 2017: You can be a 'citizen scientist' during the Great American Eclipse

For the first time in 99 years, a total solar eclipse will cross North America on Monday.

The eclipse is expected to cross from Oregon, entering the U.S. at 10:15 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time, and leaving U.S. shores from South Carolina at 2:50 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time, over the course of an hour and a half.

Explore>> Solar eclipse 2017: What time does it start; how long does it last; glasses; how to view it

Becoming a citizen scientist through The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment program begins with downloading NASA's free GLOBE Observer Eclipse APP, which will fuel a nationwide science experiment.

>> On WSBTV.com: Complete coverage of the total solar eclipse

On Monday, citizen scientists will be able to measure how the eclipse changes atmospheric conditions near them, contributing to a database used by scientists and students worldwide.

The app explains how to make eclipse observations, but you will need to obtain a thermometer to accurately measure air temperature.

Explore>> Solar eclipse 2017: Is it safe to take a selfie with the eclipse? How to do it the right way

Joining the experiment means you can help collect cloud and temperature data with your phone.

NASA said that observers in areas with a partial eclipse or those who are outside the path of totality are encouraged to participate alongside those within totality.

To learn more about how NASA is looking for the solar eclipses to help understand earth's energy, click here.

Explore>> Read more trending news

Fourteen states will experience night-like darkness for approximately two minutes in the middle of the day, according to NASA.

"No matter where you are in North America, whether it's cloudy, clear, or rainy, NASA wants as many people as possible to help with this citizen scientist project," said Kristen Weaver, deputy coordinator for the project. "We want to inspire a million eclipse viewers to become eclipse scientists."

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Caption
Explaining Total Eclipses

Credit: DaytonDailyNews