How to keep Facebook from accessing your information 

Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica data grab scandal started with a personality quiz app but it’s not the only Facebook App you should be worried about, according to tech experts. 

“You’ve probably given away a lot of information and unfortunately that information is used to manipulate people,” said Gayle Jenkins, the owner of DNA Computers in Kettering.

Jenkins found over 100 apps on her own Facebook account that have grabbed her profile information, friend list, posts, likes, or even photos she’s posted and photos she’s tagged in. 

A look at my phone revealed over 70 apps including “Apply Magic Sauce.”

According to their website, the app translates individuals digital footprints into psychological profiles. Jenkins showed me how to get rid of it. 

Recommended for you

Recommended for you

Recommended for you

Most read

  1. 1 Brooklyne Mason of WSU balances soccer, school, motherhood
  2. 2 Windy weather damages Middletown holiday light display
  3. 3 Le Macaron French Pastries coming to Liberty Center

 

To remove or modify these Facebook Apps and quizzes using your phone:

Open the Facebook app

Click the menu (which is typically designated by three lines)

Select “account settings”

Click “apps”

Choose apps you want to delete 

 

To delete Facebook Apps on a desktop or laptop:

Log on to Facebook

Click the menu (the small triangle in the upper right corner)

Click “settings”

Click “apps” (located in a list on the left side of the screen)

Select an app 

Select the pencil icon to modify settings or click the “X” to delete the app

 

You can turn off all app access completely, but Jenkins recommends deleting apps one by one.

“if you scroll down past the apps there is a box where you can turn off Platform. Platform is the interface which allows Facebook to work with third-party websites and software. If you disable it, you can’t log into anything with Facebook anymore,” said Jenkins.

Jenkins warns of another big risk with access you grant these apps.

“If they collect enough information they could actually carry out a social engineering hack,” Jenkins said, “potentially answering your security questions or pretending to be you and call a company and request access to information about you.” 

More from Journal-news