Hamilton preschoolers give Meals on Wheels recipients holiday gifts

As part of Colonial Schools inter-generational programming, students colored holiday cards for Meals on Wheels participants, collected pet supplies for their furry friends, and delivered them to the lucky recipients recently.
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As part of Colonial Schools inter-generational programming, students colored holiday cards for Meals on Wheels participants, collected pet supplies for their furry friends, and delivered them to the lucky recipients recently.

Showing off an abundance of Christmas spirit, preschoolers at Colonial Schools made holiday cards for recipients of Meals on Wheels and also delivered some extra goodies to add to the good cheer.

Katie Wright of Community First Solutions said students were happy to share some goodwill during the holiday season.

“As part of Colonial Schools’ inter-generational programming, students colored holiday cards for Meals on Wheels participants, collected pet supplies for their furry friends, and delivered them to Meals on Wheels representatives,” Wright said.

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Karen Makela, director of Colonial Schools, said the cards warmed the hearts of the people who received them.

“I can’t think of a better way to make someone smile than a holiday card from a child,” she said. “While it is the season of giving, we think it is important our students give all year round.”

Westover Retirement Community resident Phyllis Tuley, along with Community First Solutions employees Gareth Williams and Julie Kobel, were there on behalf of Meals on Wheels to accept the special delivery.

“I think this is just wonderful,” Tuley said. “It’s like receiving something from my great-grandchildren.”

“I’ve seen people cry when they get the cards,” Williams explained. “Many of the recipients do not have family near during the holidays. The cards act as a touching reminder that someone else cares.”

Koebel said the act of kindness from the young students leaves a long-lasting impression.

“Some love the cards so much they put them in plastic sleeves,” Koebel said. “I still see them hanging on refrigerators in July.”

Wright said the cards are one example of the year-long projects Colonial Schools does with the Westover Retirement Community for their inter-generational programming.

Students have “grandfriends” (older adults) and participate in a variety of activities such as coloring pictures, exercising together, putting on pet parades, and more.

“The meaningful interactions give children a positive outlook on aging and Westover residents a reason to smile,” Wright said.