What it takes to become an Army football player

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What it takes to become an Army football player

When Cameron Hoelscher made his college football verbal commitment last summer, not much distinguished it from similar announcements on social media. 

Along with a picture of the Springfield linebacker in his future uniform, there was a brief and heart-felt message thanking those who have helped him get to this point and expressing excitement about his next challenge. 

That’s a little deceiving, though. 

More went into making this one possible — and we’re not talking about any extra time crafting the message or getting those pictures just right. 

That’s because Hoelscher is not planning to continue his career at just any college or university. He’ll be going to the United States Military Academy at West Point

For those who decide to go the service academy route, more than a conversation with a coach is required before it’s official. 

Hoelscher described the process for us after Springfield’s signing day ceremony last week. 

Springfield linebacker Cameron Hoeslcher is going to continue his football career at Army. He takes us through the process of getting accepted to West Point, one that differs from the average Division I athlete in a few ways.

The tackling machine also had offers from Kentucky, Toledo, Bowling Green, Western Michigan, Ohio, Brown, Buffalo, Mercer and Air Force. 

He chose Army because it should aid him in achieving his goal of someday joining the FBI. 

Hoelscher is not the only local 2018 prospect heading to a service academy. 

Centerville’s Jake Spewiak and Sam Vance signed with Air Force, as did Tyler Johnson of Miamisburg. 

Christian Hutchinson of Mason is going to Navy. 

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