Posted: 10:17 a.m. Saturday, March 22, 2014

BUTLER COUNTY GOP

Kasich: Turning deficit into surplus means ‘nobody gets a deal’

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Kasich: Turning deficit into surplus means ‘nobody gets a deal’ photo
Gov. John Kasich talked on Friday at the Butler County Republican Party Lincoln Day Dinner at the Oscar Event Center in Fairfield about initiatives he and his administration has worked on since he’s been Ohio’s governor and what he and his administration plans to work on this year.
Kasich: Turning deficit into surplus means ‘nobody gets a deal’ photo
Gov. John Kasich speaks on Friday at the Butler County Republican Party Lincoln Day Dinner at the Oscar Event Center in Fairfield.Gov. John Kasich talked on Friday at the Butler County Republican Party Lincoln Day Dinner at the Oscar Event Center in Fairfield about initiatives he and his administration has worked on since he’s been Ohio’s governor and what he and his administration plans to work on this year.
Kasich: Turning deficit into surplus means ‘nobody gets a deal’ photo
Gov. John Kasich speaks on Friday at the Butler County Republican Party Lincoln Day Dinner at the Oscar Event Center in Fairfield.

By Michael D. Pitman

Staff Writer

FAIRFIELD —

Gov. John Kasich said the key to turning a potential $8 billion deficit into a $1.5 billion surplus is that “nobody gets a deal,” a lesson he said he learned growing up in Pennsylvania.

Kasich was the keynote speaker Friday night when hundreds of Republicans packed the top floor of the Oscar Event Center in Fairfield for the Butler County Republican Party’s Lincoln Day Dinner, the party’s largest fundraiser. He said a key to balancing the state’s budget and working toward a surplus is to not cut anybody breaks.

“You can’t do it that way,” said the Republican governor who is up for re-election this November. “When you go about setting priorities — and it’s the same way you go about setting priorities with your family — what do we really need, what would we like to have, and what is it we don’t need. You have to make those decisions and you have to figure out a better way to carry on your life with a limited number of resources, and that’s exactly what we did.”

Kasich said his administration has worked to turn the deficit the state faced post-recession into a nearly $1.5 billion budget surplus.

“My parents taught me about personal responsibility, hard work, having big dreams, being compassionate, a belief in God and using common sense,” he told the partisan crowd. “That’s what they told me. I operate that very way today.”

The governor talked about many of the initiatives his administration and the Republican-led General Assembly is working on in 2014, and has worked on since he took office defeating the incumbent Democrat Ted Strickland in 2010.

Some of the initiatives include offering a tax break for small businesses and “killing” the death tax, improving the job climate, improving K-12 and higher education, addressing the state’s drug abuse problems, and helping veterans find work and education once they leave service.

Kasich reflected on Lincoln and his effort during the Civil War, and his effort to “fight on with principle, a principle to set people free” and that is the “legacy” of the Republican Party.

“We’re not just a party that believes in this group or that group. We are a party that believes in principle, that believes in taking back our neighborhoods and building our families and restoring values. Restoring the value of common sense and accountability and personal responsibility. That’s who we are. Of local control of our schools, of cutting taxes so we can run the country and our towns from the bottom up, not the top down. You’ve got to understand that. And if we don’t keep winning, it will be rolled back. (Democrats) think much differently than we do.”

Before the county’s Lincoln Day Dinner, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ed FitzGerald, the Cuyahoga County executive and Kasich’s chief opponent in November, said in Kasich’s speech to GOP insiders “he will continue to tout Ohio’s economic miracle.”

In a press release, Daniel McElhatton, communications director for the FitzGerald campaign, wrote: “Here’s why there’s nothing miraculous about Ohio’s ‘recovery’ for the middle class: the Governor’s drastic budget cuts have forced local taxes to increase and firefighters and social workers to be laid-off; and Butler County’s Republican Auditor even criticized Kasich’s repeal of the Homestead tax exemption.”

The release refers to Lakota Local School District’s need to ask for a 5.5-mill levy that voters support and will cost owners of a $100,000 home $192 a year because of budget issues; city of Middletown’s decision to lay-off 15 firefighters due to budget constraints; Butler County Job and Family Services need to lay off a third of its staff; and Butler County Roger Reynolds’ criticism of the state’s change to the Homestead Exemption.

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