Middletown increasing public safety budget in 2018

2:40 p.m Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017 Middletown
Middletown City Council made public safety among its top priorities for the 2018 city budget. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF

Middletown plans to spend more than $22 million on public safety in 2018, which is a more than 5 percent increase over 2017 spending levels.

Public safety accounts for 69.3 percent — or just more than two-thirds — of the city’s nearly $32.2 million general fund budget proposed for 2018. Overall, the city’s proposed 2018 budget is up just more than $2.2 million, or 7.4 percent.

“We’re going to put our money where the crime is occurring,” City Manager Doug Adkins said.

MORE: Middletown police join Butler County’s specialized drug taskforce

That means the city’s criminal investigations section will go from 20 to 13 officers as seven detectives will move to an expanded narcotics section. The narcotics sectionwill focus on deterring the opioid crisis.

One additional patrol officer will also be added in 2018.

The Division of Police is being budgeted at more than $12.1 million, up 4.1 percent, according to Adkins.

MORE: Juvenile arrests in Middletown nearly double from one year ago

The Division of Fire is slated for $10.1 million, up 7.9 percent over 2017. The proposed budget includes a $937,537 federal SAFER Grant for firefighters, which represents a full year of the funding, and a $337,690 federal grant to purchase new breathing apparatuses for firefighters.

Retirements and a federal SAFER grant will enable fire operations to grow from 60 to 72 firefighters. The fire division will move three more staff to fire inspections/prevention to help enforce the city’s chronic nuisance ordinance and other fire inspections.

In 2018, the Division of Fire will also start implementing its strategic plan which is nearing completion. It will also be looking at future new station locations.

Adkins said savings could be realized through a reduction of calls for service once a new Use of Address Management Software System is implemented for police, fire and EMS.

MORE: Middletown police chief wants to charge addicts who OD in public

One of the preferences made by City Council in June when it was identifying budget priorities was additional money for public safety.

The top four priority areas were road paving; housing stock and neighborhoods; additional public safety; and economic development/workforce development.

MORE: Middletown council wants more spending for public safety, jobs

Vice Mayor Dora Bronston was one of the council members who said there should be a higher priority for public safety, noting the city’s crime and drug issues.

The rest of the city’s non-public safety General Fund budget will be presented at council’s Oct. 17 meeting. Adkins said council will receive budget legislation at its first meeting in November so it can be considered for approval before Dec. 31.

View full experience