Want to avoid getting hacked while driving? Check this out

Want to avoid getting hacked while driving? Check this out

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David Barzilai, Karamba Security, co-founder & executive chairman

Computers control an increasing number of vehicle functions now, and will do so even more in the future when autonomous — or self-driving — cars and trucks become more common. Given that technology in the vehicles we drive is ever increasing, how safe are we from cyber intruders? 

David Barzilai, Chairman and co-founder of Karamba Security

“We’ve enabled hackers to gain access to the car by a small set of controllers. Once one of them is compromised then hackers can gain control of that controller and then manipulate the other controllers (and) start sending commands to the car. In essence we as drivers are now losing control. Because (hackers can cause the) car to stop on the highway, airbags may disengage, the steering wheel could start to go one direction or another without us having any control of it.”

Vance Saunders, director of the cybersecurity program at Wright State University

“The world has changed. Everything is so interconnected and with that comes the potential for bad things to happen. So therefore there is a responsibility for all auto manufacturers – it doesn’t mean just cars – people who make anything. It’s going to get connected to the internet and they have responsibility to address security because the environment that their products were being used in has changed.”

Carla Bailo, assistant vice president for mobility research and business development at Ohio State University

“(Safeguards are needed) to protect the data. To ensure that these products are not hacked. That the bad guys won’t try do something either to the vehicle or infrastructure. Because either way it can create dire consequences.”

Carla Bailo Assistant Vice President Mobility Research and Business Development at Ohio State University HANDOUT/Handout

Seth Hamman, assistant professor of computer science Cedarville University

“It will be a long time before they exhaust all of their attack vectors….There’s no shortage of different avenues to try.”

C. Emre Koksal, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Ohio State University

“One way to cause chaos is to go out there and inject fake messages (into vehicle computers).”

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