Two beloved area K-9 officers remembered after deaths

Two beloved area K-9 officers remembered after deaths

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Kilo, a retired police dog for Warren County Sheriff’s Office, died this week. CONTRIBUTED

Two Miami Valley canines known for fighting crime are being remembered after their deaths, one in Warren County, the other in Eaton.

Kilo, a retired K-9, specialized in drug detection for the Warren County Sheriff’s Office.

“We’re sad to see that he passed away. He was extremely good at what he did,” Sheriff Larry Sims said.

Dr. Rich Coleman of the Four Paws Animal Hospital in Lebanon posted news of the dog’s passing on Wednesday, Oct. 19, on the Let’s Talk Lebanon Facebook page.

“Tonight was one of my hardest nights as a vet. I lost one of the patients that meant the most to me. He was my first Canine Officer that I had the privilege to care for,” Coleman said in the post.

“Today it is with a heavy heart that I tell you Warren County has lost a hero. Retired Warren County Sheriff K9 Kilo was an amazing officer, partner and companion. Warren County and our country as a whole owe him a great debt. He aided in the removal of drugs and drug money from the streets of our community. His service was 2007-2014.”

Coleman also posted Kilo’s drug seizure totals:

Marijuana- 405.720 Grams

Cocaine- 4,967 Grams

Heroin- 7,222 Grams

Methamphetamine- 8 grams

Paraphernalia- 212 pieces

Pills- 1,056

Currency- $1,069,556

“Kilo was the first drug dog we’ve had here in many, many years,” Sims added this morning.

Also, the Eaton Police Department eulogized its first K-9 on Facebook.

“We are sad to announce that retired K9 Koda was laid to rest yesterday after struggling with canine degenerative myelopathy. The disease had rendered Koda paralyzed,” according to a Facebook post.

“Koda was the Eaton Police Division’s first ever police canine, and he served the City of Eaton from 2010-2016; making numerous drug arrests and showing our community the value of having a drug dog on our police force. In addition to helping us fight crime, Koda also made numerous appearances at our schools and at community events.”

The eulogy continued, “Koda had a neat back story since he was rescued from an animal shelter in Houston, Texas. From there he was adopted by a canine training facility in Austin, Texas, and that is where Chief DePew trained with him before bringing him back to Eaton. Koda’s birthday was on September 11th, so becoming a police canine and working for our community was in his blood. Koda will be missed.”

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